Navacims present disease-specific peptide-MHC to T cell receptors

Navacims are made with an iron oxide core nanoparticle core encapsulated with a polymer coating conjugated to a peptide-major histocompatibility complex (peptide-MHC) protein.

Navacims become pharmacologically active and disease-specific from the unique antigenic peptide selected for each Navacim.

Navacims – Enabling Disease-Specific Immunoregulation

Navacims find specific disease-causing autoantigen-experienced T cells and present a high-density array of disease specific pMHC to cognate T cell receptors (TCR). Navacim high density binding to TCR micro-clusters causes signaling which reprograms disease-causing T cells (effectors) to differentiate and expand into disease-regulating Treg cells (suppressors). The disease-specific Treg cells selectively suppress autoimmune attacks on self.

Reverse autoimmune disease by reprogramming disease-causing immune T cells to differentiate and expand into disease-regulating Treg cells
Reverse autoimmune disease by reprogramming disease-causing immune T cells to differentiate and expand into disease-regulating Treg cells

A key therapeutic advantage to Parvus’ approach is that Navacims need present only one disease-related antigen to convert effector T cells into functional Tregs. Navacims induce a massive expansion of disease-specific Tregs, and it is this expanded population of Tregs that in turn activate other immune regulatory cells (including B cells) to broadly shut down the activity of polyclonal inflammatory cells contributing to the disease.

Because Navacims act only upon the disease-related inflammatory immune cells, their biologic activity is designed to be self-limiting and sustained only until the immune system is restored to a balanced, “response ready,” immune-tolerant state. In preclinical disease models, Navacims have demonstrated broad therapeutic activity and disease reversal across a range of autoimmune disorders including diabetes, multiple sclerosis, autoimmune liver disease and inflammatory bowel disease while consistently preserving immunocompetence to resist viral, microbial, and tumor challenges.

Navacims empower a naturally occurring mechanism to suppress autoimmunity that is wired into our immune system by natural evolution to protect us against autoimmune disease. This leads to a resolution of tissue inflammation without affecting normal functions of the immune system.

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